Visa

A citizen of a foreign country, who wishes to enter the United States, generally must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa (green card) for permanent residence. The type of visa required is defined by immigration law, and relates to the purpose of travel.

Visas for same-sex partners from countries where such marriage is not allowed

Question details

My partner is a teacher and was granted a J-1 visa on September 25, 2019. We've been together under one roof for 5 years and undergone the rite of Holy Union since same-sex marriage is not honored in the Philippines. I would like to seek advice on the best possible way on how to go to the US. Should I still push through with the J-2 visa application or as a tourist or visitor?

FAQ Transcript





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Legal Stay to the Parent of US Citizen Child With Disability

Question details

My spouse and me are staying in USA since last 10 years on work visa H-1B. We have our second daughter born in 2016 who is facing neurological disability which requires long term care and constant therapies. Current scenario is my husband's H-1B has denied and couldn't get back to USA. I am here in USA with my both kids on B2 Visa. My both kids are US Citizens. Is there any legislation which can provide legal stay to the parent of child with disability in the USA?

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Is there any law to provide legal stay to the parent of US citizen child with disability?

Video Transcript

The answer is No. You can stay on a tourist visa. There are no special visas or green card for such situations.  More...

 

 

FAQ Transcript





Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

Reciprocity: What's New?

Nonimmigrant visa applicants from certain countries/areas of authority may be required to pay a visa issuance fee after their application is approved. These fees are based on the principle of  reciprocity:  when a foreign government imposes fees on U.S. citizens for certain types of visas, the United States will impose a reciprocal fee on citizens of that country/area of authority for similar types of visas. 

Immigration Consequences of a Denial of Entry at the Airport

Question details

I had been travelling to the US on a tourist visa for all my life, in 2008 I had to travel out of the country and when I returned to the US, in the Minneapolis checkpoint they found a pay stub from my work which I obviously shouldn't have had since I didn't have a work permit, they took away my tourist visa and made me sign what looked like a "voluntary departure" or "refusal of entry" I really can't remember exactly the term that I signed and was returned to MX the next day. <br>

My questions are:<br>
1. Is there a website where I can see if I was penalized? <br>
2. Will I be able to solicit another tourist visa? <br>
3. If the answer to the above question is yes, given the political climate, do you think it is a good idea to go through the whole process again or would it just be a waste of money?<br>
4. My father has become a US citizen, I'm unmarried, can he request citizenship for me or residency? approximately how long is the process?

FAQ Transcript





Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

USCIS No Longer Accepting Petitions for One-Time Increase to the Temporary Nonagricultural Visa Program

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is no longer accepting petitions from U. S. employers seeking to hire temporary nonagricultural workers under the one-time increase to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 H-2B cap announced in July.

For the first time, in May, Congress delegated its authority to the Secretary of Homeland Security to increase the number of temporary nonagricultural work visas available to U.S. employers through FY 2017.