214(b) FAQs

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com

Are you eligible to become a naturalized US citizen?

Authored on: Wed, 01/26/2022 - 04:04

Question

1. My Son was born in February 2020 in the USA, where my wife is on an F1 visa working on OPT. Due to the Covid19 pandemic, I couldn't meet my son for two years. Kindly suggest to me the way forward to meet my son and wife. I also tried to travel on a tourist visa and F1 Visa. Unfortunately, I got both rejections. I'm an Indian taxpayer and an IT employee. 

2. My brother is a US citizen, and he applied for our mother's green card. Everything is clear, all paperwork is done, but due to the pandemic, we are waiting for the interview date from March 2021. Do you have any information on how we get the date or how much time it will take?

3. My daughter is in Dallas, US, and under medical treatment. She is there with an IN40 visa. As a father, I want to be there during her medical urgency. How can I get a visa now to be with her in the US?

4. I am a US citizen currently in India. I am traveling back to the States in mid-February for two months and want to take my Indian-citizen senior citizen mother with me for that duration. Her last US tourist visa expired eight years ago. (She has an active Schengen visa on her passport) Is there a way she can get a short-term two-month visa to the US?

5. I stayed outside of the US for more than two years because of COVID-19. Am I eligible for naturalization? I came to the USA in August 2016.

 

Answer

*Please note that the queries have been put together and edited by the Economic Times to address similar questions at once and that the answers are clear and relevant to the audience.

1. My Son was born in February 2020 in the USA, where my wife is on an F1 visa working on OPT. Due to the Covid19 pandemic, I couldn't meet my son for two years. Kindly suggest to me the way forward to meet my son and wife. I also tried to travel on a tourist visa and F1 Visa. Unfortunately, I got both rejections. I'm an Indian taxpayer and an IT employee. 

You seem to be referring to a visa denial under Immigration and Nationality Act, section 214(b).

This law applies only to nonimmigrant visa categories. If you are refused a visa under section 214(b), it means that you did not overcome the presumption of immigrant intent required by law by sufficiently demonstrating that you have strong ties to your home country. Such ties are seen as a reason you will not be tempted to exceed your allowed stay in the USA.

When your spouse is already in the US, your ties to your home country are difficult to demonstrate. If you feel there is additional information that should be considered related to the visa decision, or there are significant changes in your circumstances since your last application, you may reapply for a visa. Note that visas like H-1, H-4 (if your spouse gets an H-1), and L-1 are immune from this problem. So, when your wife obtains an H-1B status, or you can qualify for an L-1 visa, you should not have the section 214(b) denials impede your visa.

2. My brother is a US citizen, and he applied for our mother's green card. Everything is clear, all paperwork is done, but due to the pandemic, we are waiting for the interview date from March 2021. Do you have any information on how we get the date or how much time it will take?

Because of the resurgence of the pandemic and a huge backlog of cases, it is unlikely we will see an immediate resolution of the delays. But consulates have indicated that give preference to families of immediate relatives, like parents, of US citizens. Also, the US consulates have started waiving some nonimmigrant visa interviews, which should streamline their operations for green cards as well.

3. My daughter is in Dallas, US, and under medical treatment. She is there with an IN40 visa. As a father, I want to be there during her medical urgency. How can I get a visa now to be with her in the US?

I am not sure what type of visa your daughter has, but your choice appears to be the same as for any other foreign national, a B visa. The consulates usually issue a B-1/B-2 visa or a B-1 visa for medical issues and attending family members.

4. I am a US citizen currently in India. I am traveling back to the States in mid-February for two months and want to take my Indian-citizen senior citizen mother with me for that duration. Her last US tourist visa expired eight years ago. (She has an active Schengen visa on her passport) Is there a way she can get a short-term two-month visa to the US?

You will have to apply for her tourist visa again.

5. I stayed outside of the US for more than two years because of COVID-19. Am I eligible for naturalization? I came to the USA in August 2016.

It appears that the continuity of your stay required for naturalization has been broken by an absence of one year. An absence from the United States for a continuous period of 1 year or more (365 days or more) will automatically break the continuity of residence. It appears you could apply after 4 years and one day after returning, or easier, 4 years and 6 months after returning. The USCIS provides the following example for your situation:

“An applicant for naturalization under INA 316 departs the United States on January 1, 2010, and returns January 2, 2011. The applicant has been outside the United States for exactly 1 year (365 days) and has therefore broken the continuity of his or her residence in the United States. The applicant must wait until at least January 3, 2015, to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period immediately preceding the application will date back to January 3, 2010. At that time, although the applicant will have been absent from the United States for less than 1 year during the statutory period, the applicant will still have been absent from the United States for more than 6 months (180 days) during the statutory period and may be eligible for naturalization if he or she successfully rebuts the presumption that he or she has broken the continuity of her residence.

If the applicant cannot overcome the presumption of a break in the continuity of his or her residence, the applicant must wait until at least July 6, 2015, to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period immediately preceding the application will date back to July 6, 2010. During the 5-year period of July 6, 2010 to July 6, 2015, assuming the applicant did not make any additional trips outside the United States that would cause USCIS to presume a break in continuity of residence, the applicant was only absent from the United States between July 6, 2010 and January 2, 2011, a period that is not more than 6 months. Therefore, no presumption of a break in continuous residence applies.”

Impact of 214(b) denial

Authored on: Tue, 03/10/2020 - 01:39

Question

My boyfriend is applying for his F1 Visa in July 2020 for fall semester 2020 for his MS in Finance at one of the US universities (deciding on which one right now). This is a question asked well in advanced so we are fully prepared.

Answer

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Impact of 214(b) denial

Video Transcript:

Make sure he goes to a good university. If somebody is going to a top tier university the consular officer might be more inclined to consider the application as being a genuine application. Please be sure you are honest when applying. FAQ in detail...



Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

Parents Visa Denied Based on 214(b) Twice

Authored on: Mon, 03/05/2018 - 10:11

Question

Below is my dads background .<br>
Mom has always been a house wife & have lived in India most of her life except for 2 years in 1989 to 1991.
My dad has been working in the Yemen for a subsidiary of American company called Clorex for 10 years as a plant manager for a chemical plant(purely management job). Did an MBA 2 years prior to his retirement at the age of 56 since the company sponsored it as part of employee benefit.Since then he had been living as a retiree , now for 4 years. In between I have took them to Singapore & Malaysia .Have a permanent residence in India .He pays luxury tax for that home. Has a daughter(married and settled in a different town) and a son other than me(works and lives with them in their house) ( I work in the USA on an H1 for past 2 years).Have travel history to Saudi Arabia but not in the past 5 years.
I completely understand its the burden of applicant to prove the non immigrant Intent. But doesn't know how since both the times the officer didn't ask much .Both the times it was a joint interview .Wanted to know your comments.

Answer

Tourist visas are often denied based upon incomprehensible reasons. The most difficult reason to overcome is the 214B denial. Essentially, the consular officer says that your parents possess immigrant intent and that he is not convinced they will come back. You can ask for a supervisory review of that decision, but most of the times they don't work.

214(b) Expiration

Authored on: Fri, 07/07/2017 - 05:05

Question

I want to take my fiancé on a vacation to Hawaii but she stated she received a 214b due to a failed student visa in Oct 2014; at the same time her ESTA expired. Prior to that she had visited the states and left on time without overstay. My fiancé is Japanese and was in her late 20s when denied without explanation. Is there an expiration on 214b?I want to take my fiancé on a vacation to Hawaii but she stated she received a 214b due to a failed student visa in Oct 2014; at the same time her ESTA expired. Prior to that she had visited the states and left on time without overstay. My fiancé is Japanese and was in her late 20s when denied without explanation. Is there an expiration on 214b?

Answer

Getting married to a US citizen and applying for a K visa/green card will remove the 214(b) issue. There is no expiration of this denial.Getting married to a US citizen and applying for a K visa/green card will remove the 214(b) issue. There is no expiration of this denial.

Denial based upon immigrant intent, 214(b)

Authored on: Wed, 03/25/2015 - 05:18

Question

My F-1 visa was denied twice for the reason 214(b). I have visited my uncle in U.S for 6 months on a vacation. My Uncle (U.S citizen) sponsored me for my both F-1 (student visas). On my first appearance for F-1 visa interview in Chennai consulate my B-2 visa was cancelled by interviewing officer . Now I plan to appear for F-1 visa with my parents sponsorship. Will there be any problem for me in applying F-1 visa interview this time?

Answer

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question. 

https://youtu.be/GtOqgqgEG6I?t=87

FAQ Transcript

214(b) denials, typically you will come across in student visa applications, tourist visa applications, even J-1/J-2 applications. They can be problematic because they are very difficult to overturn. It is a matter of subjective determination of the consulate that they suspect the applicant has an immigration intention.

If somebody has come to the US on a tourist visa or any other nonimmigrant visa and gone back within the time permitted that’s a good sign. That shows that you are somebody that you can be trusted. In a case like yours unless there was a reason for the consulate not to trust your submission they should have considered your case more sympathetically than the case of somebody who has never been to the United States.

I don’t think the sponsorship is a problem.