F-1 Visa FAQs

Dropping education to work

Authored on: Fri, 06/24/2022 - 12:05

Question

Hello Sir, Thank you for everything you do. I am planning to enroll in a Day 1 CPT MBA program and was wondering if dropping the course midway will affect my chances of getting a future H1-B or L1-A to green card process? Also, do you know any way that we can vet a university before joining the program? Thank you, Jaidev

Answer

As long as you act in good faith (honest intentions), dropping a program of study should not be an issue. Also, you can continue going to school part-time or even full-time if you like while you perform your job on an H-1B or L-1A.

While waiting for OPT approval, is "unpaid leave of absence" a violation of the student status?

Authored on: Fri, 06/17/2022 - 02:43

Question

Is it considered a violation of F-1 status to be on "unpaid leaves of absence" instead of being unemployed while waiting for OPT approval?

Answer

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Impact of criminal misdemeanor case on an F-1 or any status

Authored on: Thu, 04/21/2022 - 05:32

Question

I am on an F-1 visa and when I was working in a gas station I was caught for illegal distribution of cigarettes to underage. They issued a notice to attend the court. And my charge is 2927.02(B)(1) M4 under Ohio state law. I went to court, in front of a judge I plead guilty to the issue. I paid the fine on that day only. Later on, the case was shown on my SSN. Here are my questions,

1. Will it affect my OPT EAD card? Because I am going to apply in May.
2. Can I go and return from my home country?
3. In the future, do I need to face any issues regarding immigration?
4. Do I need to contact an attorney regarding this case? About any documentation.
 

Answer

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From F-1 OPT directly applying for a green card

Authored on: Thu, 04/21/2022 - 05:15

Question

I was born in the United Arab Emirates, but have Indian citizenship. I did my bachelors in the U.S and am currently pursuing my Masters here as well. I was wondering with the ongoing corona crisis, would it be realistic to apply for GC within 6 months of the job starting and hope I get it before my three years of OPT ends? 

Answer

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Implications on working without authorization on student visa status

Authored on: Mon, 04/11/2022 - 06:39

Question

What happens when a student works without authorization because they have no choice as they need the money to support their school or because they did it unintentionally?

Answer

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Relation between F-1 OPT and H-1B lottery change of status and changing employers

Authored on: Tue, 03/22/2022 - 06:44

Question

I am a student on F-1 and will be graduating by December 2022. Company A is willing to apply for an H-1B for me this year. I am interviewing with other companies, and I am planning to drop company A as soon as I graduate

1. If I am selected in the lottery and haven't done a change of status, can I continue on F-1 OPT with the other company (not Company A), after graduation?

2. Can Company A retract my H-1B if I leave them?

3. Being on F-1 can Company A start my green card if I win the H-1B lottery?

 

Answer

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Relation between F-1 status and I-485 AOS (child covered under Child Status Protection Act (CSPA))

Authored on: Tue, 03/22/2022 - 06:39

Question

In October'20 I filed for the EB3 downgrade based on the Date of Filing, my wife and son were included in the petition. In December'20 my son filed for the F1 - I539 adjustment of status petition. In April'21 my wife, son, and I received the GC EAD Cards. In Aug '21 the EB3 Final Action Date became current for me, and my son became 21 and should be covered under CSPA. In Feb'22 USCIS approved his I-539 F1 COS petition. My son is a Senior in college doing his major in Industrial Engineering in the final semester. He is on the lookout for possible internship/employment opportunities. Does the F1 approval mean he is no longer under GC EAD? What's your recommendation on whether he should choose to be on F1 or seek employment on GC EAD?

 

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Are you eligible to become a naturalized US citizen?

Authored on: Wed, 01/26/2022 - 04:04

Question

1. My Son was born in February 2020 in the USA, where my wife is on an F1 visa working on OPT. Due to the Covid19 pandemic, I couldn't meet my son for two years. Kindly suggest to me the way forward to meet my son and wife. I also tried to travel on a tourist visa and F1 Visa. Unfortunately, I got both rejections. I'm an Indian taxpayer and an IT employee. 

2. My brother is a US citizen, and he applied for our mother's green card. Everything is clear, all paperwork is done, but due to the pandemic, we are waiting for the interview date from March 2021. Do you have any information on how we get the date or how much time it will take?

3. My daughter is in Dallas, US, and under medical treatment. She is there with an IN40 visa. As a father, I want to be there during her medical urgency. How can I get a visa now to be with her in the US?

4. I am a US citizen currently in India. I am traveling back to the States in mid-February for two months and want to take my Indian-citizen senior citizen mother with me for that duration. Her last US tourist visa expired eight years ago. (She has an active Schengen visa on her passport) Is there a way she can get a short-term two-month visa to the US?

5. I stayed outside of the US for more than two years because of COVID-19. Am I eligible for naturalization? I came to the USA in August 2016.

 

Answer

*Please note that the queries have been put together and edited by the Economic Times to address similar questions at once and that the answers are clear and relevant to the audience.

1. My Son was born in February 2020 in the USA, where my wife is on an F1 visa working on OPT. Due to the Covid19 pandemic, I couldn't meet my son for two years. Kindly suggest to me the way forward to meet my son and wife. I also tried to travel on a tourist visa and F1 Visa. Unfortunately, I got both rejections. I'm an Indian taxpayer and an IT employee. 

You seem to be referring to a visa denial under Immigration and Nationality Act, section 214(b).

This law applies only to nonimmigrant visa categories. If you are refused a visa under section 214(b), it means that you did not overcome the presumption of immigrant intent required by law by sufficiently demonstrating that you have strong ties to your home country. Such ties are seen as a reason you will not be tempted to exceed your allowed stay in the USA.

When your spouse is already in the US, your ties to your home country are difficult to demonstrate. If you feel there is additional information that should be considered related to the visa decision, or there are significant changes in your circumstances since your last application, you may reapply for a visa. Note that visas like H-1, H-4 (if your spouse gets an H-1), and L-1 are immune from this problem. So, when your wife obtains an H-1B status, or you can qualify for an L-1 visa, you should not have the section 214(b) denials impede your visa.

2. My brother is a US citizen, and he applied for our mother's green card. Everything is clear, all paperwork is done, but due to the pandemic, we are waiting for the interview date from March 2021. Do you have any information on how we get the date or how much time it will take?

Because of the resurgence of the pandemic and a huge backlog of cases, it is unlikely we will see an immediate resolution of the delays. But consulates have indicated that give preference to families of immediate relatives, like parents, of US citizens. Also, the US consulates have started waiving some nonimmigrant visa interviews, which should streamline their operations for green cards as well.

3. My daughter is in Dallas, US, and under medical treatment. She is there with an IN40 visa. As a father, I want to be there during her medical urgency. How can I get a visa now to be with her in the US?

I am not sure what type of visa your daughter has, but your choice appears to be the same as for any other foreign national, a B visa. The consulates usually issue a B-1/B-2 visa or a B-1 visa for medical issues and attending family members.

4. I am a US citizen currently in India. I am traveling back to the States in mid-February for two months and want to take my Indian-citizen senior citizen mother with me for that duration. Her last US tourist visa expired eight years ago. (She has an active Schengen visa on her passport) Is there a way she can get a short-term two-month visa to the US?

You will have to apply for her tourist visa again.

5. I stayed outside of the US for more than two years because of COVID-19. Am I eligible for naturalization? I came to the USA in August 2016.

It appears that the continuity of your stay required for naturalization has been broken by an absence of one year. An absence from the United States for a continuous period of 1 year or more (365 days or more) will automatically break the continuity of residence. It appears you could apply after 4 years and one day after returning, or easier, 4 years and 6 months after returning. The USCIS provides the following example for your situation:

“An applicant for naturalization under INA 316 departs the United States on January 1, 2010, and returns January 2, 2011. The applicant has been outside the United States for exactly 1 year (365 days) and has therefore broken the continuity of his or her residence in the United States. The applicant must wait until at least January 3, 2015, to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period immediately preceding the application will date back to January 3, 2010. At that time, although the applicant will have been absent from the United States for less than 1 year during the statutory period, the applicant will still have been absent from the United States for more than 6 months (180 days) during the statutory period and may be eligible for naturalization if he or she successfully rebuts the presumption that he or she has broken the continuity of her residence.

If the applicant cannot overcome the presumption of a break in the continuity of his or her residence, the applicant must wait until at least July 6, 2015, to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period immediately preceding the application will date back to July 6, 2010. During the 5-year period of July 6, 2010 to July 6, 2015, assuming the applicant did not make any additional trips outside the United States that would cause USCIS to presume a break in continuity of residence, the applicant was only absent from the United States between July 6, 2010 and January 2, 2011, a period that is not more than 6 months. Therefore, no presumption of a break in continuous residence applies.”

Options to remain in status: F-1 visa expired, H-1B approved for consular processing, but not stamped

Authored on: Mon, 12/20/2021 - 09:15

Question

My son got his H-1B approved on consular processing this year which also happens to be the first year on OPT. His F-1 Visa expired in June and he is unable to travel to India for lack of slots for H-1B stamping I wish to know the following:

  1. Is there a time limit for getting the approved H-1B visa stamped?, and
  2. If for some reason he is unable to travel next year as well can he extend his stem opt to remain in status?

Answer

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1. No.

2. Yes, because remember he has deferred his H-1B change of status by requesting consular processing

 

Day 1 CPT F1 - Renewal

Authored on: Wed, 10/13/2021 - 10:39

Question

My wife is on Day-1 CPT and went for F1 renewal , without asking much question she got 214B denial. So there is an option to re-apply, do you think we should apply again and produce document which shows she got tie ups in home country ?

Answer

You can try. 214(b) denials are difficult to overcome and highly unpredictable.